Enterprise Architecture

Many IT infrastructures are set up without a common language in place that cuts across different enterprises, making it difficult for strategic decisions to be effectively translated into the organization’s technology foundation. That’s where enterprise architecture (EA) can make a difference. Effective enterprise architecture encompasses both business and technology, so it requires a broad range of experience, knowledge and skills in everything from strategy and operations to technology integration, security and human capital.

Speaking the same language
For technology leaders who have been around long enough, it usually doesn’t come as a surprise to them that their systems and infrastructure aren’t operating in an aligned fashion. That’s just what happens in a mature organization, where new companies and technology portfolios are routinely acquired, shifts in business strategy change technology goals, and islands of sophistication emerge as leaders push their teams to new heights. Although these are mostly positive changes, they can have a devastating cumulative impact if they’re not managed properly. The real question is often when to take action – and how.
Enterprise architecture is the practice of creating a technology structure that brings an organization’s processes, information systems, personnel and discrete operating units into tight alignment to support its core goals and strategies – no matter what twists and turns they make. While it involves a heavy technological component, it’s multidisciplinary, linking together business managers, technology managers and technology implementers. A technology-focused approach isn’t enough.

How we can help
Effective enterprise architecture encompasses both business and technology, so it requires a broad range of experience, knowledge and skills in everything from strategy and operations to technology integration, security and human capital.

SINTRX capabilities allows us to provide services to assist with any enterprise architecture challenge, including:
- Business strategy
- Business process reengineering
- Technology architecture
- Change management

Bottom-line benefits

  • Facilitate complex program execution.
  • Enhance business participation and ownership of IT initiatives.
  • Link corporate strategy evolution with IT.
  • Provide a clear communication mechanism between business and technology.
  • Reduce costs of platform support and integration.
  • Ease the challenges of integrating acquisitions.